Watch This Extremely Challenging SNES Game Get Decimated By Pro-Gamer Retroshinobi

To reign in the new year, pro gamer Nathan Phillips (retroshinobi) has absolutely demolished SNES action game Hagane in his latest one life run.

Hagane (literally meaning steel in Japanese) was a late release SNES title (1995) that features impressive graphics, and gameplay similar to Strider, but with added complexity in the combo system and extremely difficult gameplay.

Hagane_-_The_Final_Conflict_Coverart (1)

The game also commands a high price for collector’s looking to acquire the game – as the game can cost anywhere from $200-1000 USD on ebay:
http://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_from=R40&_trksid=m570.l1313&_nkw=hagane+snes&_sacat=0

 

I also spoke to Nathan Phillips about his strategy for beating Hagane on a single life:

Retro Obscura (Aaron): What was your strategy for completing this extremely difficult game?

Nathan Phillips: Well, my general strategy is USUALLY to isolate stages if a game has a stage select code… which this game unfortunately does not have. So this was all hardcore repetition and practice. It does have infinite continues, so one thing I could do in some sections is gradually isolate enemy placements and patterns and then kill myself off before finishing the section if possible. That jumping section of Stage 1 is, ironically, among the hardest parts of the game if you’re going for deathless. Otherwise, there are a couple “sweet spots” for most bosses, and the sword and bombs are your most powerful weapons, so I relied on those for the quickest work. Stage 3’s boss can actually be hammered down with sloppy attrition if you’re powered up to 5 health units, so I didn’t even bother making that a real fight. The hardest sections for me, besides the jumping part in Stage 1, all occur in the final stage: the rising spikes have this “sensor” you have to destroy to make them fall a little bit, so I used Smart Bombs the second they appear onscreen. This was also a lifesaver in the section following it, where I almost blew it. Then I save the rest of the smart bombs (usually 4 or 5) in tandem with the bomb subweapon on the final boss rocket chase.

RO: How many hours of practice did it take to perfect this run?

NP:
Well, this run was just over a half hour. My first unrecorded practice game yesterday went 90 minutes, refining techniques and placements, and then I played through the game 6 more times yesterday, including 2 failed recording attempts, one of which was at the boss chase.

RO: Would you use the term pro-gamer or deathless runner  to describe yourself?

NP:
Pro player and/or deathless runner is fine. I go for different feats at different times, although the channel is devoted primarily to deathless runs. I also have some times on Super Punch-Out!! for guys like Rick Bruiser in 00’10″73, which I believe is 2nd only to Zallard1’s time of 8 hundredths of a second faster. Occasionally I go for score, as well.

You can subscribe to Nathan’s retroshinobi page here for more amazing classic game runs on real hardware:
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCBHgb1wGYQDkeITjATJelMQ

One Comment
  1. Profile photo of Steven Kyer

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